A Theology of Listening

In Epiphany the church basks in the light of Christ revealed to us. Yet simultaneously we live in a world divided by difference, riven by power structures that alienate and marginalize. To our surprise, the light of God shines upon us from the other, as God listens attentively to the voice of cries from the wilderness. In showing his mercy to the oppressed, God is revealed to them in ways the powerful do not know, so that our salvation is wrapped up into listening to their voices.

This sermon series situates us as attentive listeners to marginalized theological voices that offer the wisdom of community and belonging to our fracturing power structures. After laying a theological groundwork for attentive, non-reactive listening to marginal experiences of God, we will train our attention on three voices that are too often diminished at the table in American Christianity. From the voice of Native American theology, we will the witness of the Harmony Way. From the voice of Ecotheology, we will hear the witness of creation. From the voice of Womanist theology, we will the witness of community and table.

Apocalyptic Nativities

The Church intentionally established the seasons of Advent and Christmas during the darkest time of the year. It is during this dark period that our hearts especially long for warmth and light. Biblical apocalypse is a kind of light that shines into the darkness to warm our hearts. It is a light that illuminates difference; it is a light that calls us forward into the very heart of Divinity. This sermon series therefore intends to ponder a few of the apocalyptic writings in Revelation that distinguish kings, kingdoms, endings, and ultimately, nativities. It is our sincere hope that this series is an advent of light that warms our hearts and prepares us to sing once again, “Merry Christmas!”

Apocalyptic Endings

The Church intentionally established the seasons of Advent and Christmas during the darkest time of the year. It is during this dark period that our hearts especially long for warmth and light. Biblical apocalypse is a kind of light that shines into the darkness to warm our hearts. It is a light that illuminates difference; it is a light that calls us forward into the very heart of Divinity. This sermon series therefore intends to ponder a few of the apocalyptic writings in Revelation that distinguish kings, kingdoms, endings, and ultimately, nativities. It is our sincere hope that this series is an advent of light that warms our hearts and prepares us to sing once again, “Merry Christmas!”

Apocalyptic Kingdoms

The Church intentionally established the seasons of Advent and Christmas during the darkest time of the year. It is during this dark period that our hearts especially long for warmth and light. Biblical apocalypse is a kind of light that shines into the darkness to warm our hearts. It is a light that illuminates difference; it is a light that calls us forward into the very heart of Divinity. This sermon series therefore intends to ponder a few of the apocalyptic writings in Revelation that distinguish kings, kingdoms, endings, and ultimately, nativities. It is our sincere hope that this series is an advent of light that warms our hearts and prepares us to sing once again, “Merry Christmas!”